A wonderful spring

After a winter that was too long and cold, the spring has been joyful. There has hardly been a day to complain about, and certainly the gardener must enjoy the few cool and rainy days that have made the ground ideal for planting. Many early bloomers were pushed a week or two late by the cold, but recent temperatures have been warm and most flowers are now on target.

Late frosts seem inevitable in most years, but this spring there have been no cold nights since mid March to threaten magnolia blooms or tender leaves emerging on Japanese maples.

Serviceberry flowers along the wood's edge in my garden. The lower branches receive little sunlight, so I nearly missed the blooms until I looked out from the kitchen window. I mistook the mass of white flowers initially for Dr, Merrill magnolia that is a bit further down, but a second glance took me outdoors to enjoy the serviceberrry's flowers as they rained down to the stream and pond below.

Serviceberry flowers along the wood’s edge in my garden. The lower branches receive little sunlight, so I nearly missed the blooms until I looked out from the kitchen window. I mistook the mass of white flowers initially for Dr. Merrill magnolia’s that is a bit further down, but a second glance took me outdoors to enjoy the serviceberrry’s flowers as they rained down to the stream and pond below.

Damage from winter’s cold is now becoming evident. Hydrangeas require drastic pruning, though not to the ground for most as was necessary a year ago. A few young Japanese maples have suffered, and one that was planted and stressed by neglect through last summer must be replaced, but this is not much to whine about. No doubt, the damage could have been worse.

Servceberry flowers litter the creek and moss covered stones

Servceberry flowers litter the creek and moss covered stones

Again today, I will keep the script brief, and we’ll get right to the garden since there is too much to keep up with if everything is to be covered. Today we’ll cover a few of the garden’s trees, though we’ll hold off on the dogwoods and redbuds until next week. In a few days we’ll get back around to smaller flowers.

Red Horsechestnut

The Red Horse chestnut unfurls leaves from large buds. Tucked into some leaf buds are the spring blooms.

 

The flower bud can be seen a few days after the foliage has opened.

The flower bud  of the Red Horse chestnut can be seen a few days after the foliage has opened.

Fernleaf Japanese maple

The Fernleaf Japanese maple leafs before other maples, and its flowers are more conspicuous than on other maples.

 

Lion's Head Japanese maple

The foliage of Lion’s Head Japanese maple is artfully layered along the branches.

The green leafed Viridis has just come into leaf in mid April

The green leafed Viridis has just come into leaf in mid April

The foliage of red buckeye  opens with the flower spikes already evident

The foliage of red buckeye opens with the flower spikes already evident

Elizabeth magnolia

The flowers of Elizabeth magnolia are a creamy yellow. A year ago the flowers were wrecked a night after reaching full bloom by a late freeze.

 

Jane magnolia

Jane magnolia is at its best in early April, but it flowers sporadically through the summer.

 

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2 thoughts on “A wonderful spring

  1. Dear Dave:

    Thank you for your well written observations. They are a delight to read and the pictures are lovely. Often it is the high point of my day. Keep it up!

    Michelle

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