When good sense is ignored

I have some good sense, but at least as far as the garden’s concerned, it’s displayed only on rare occasions. In an effort to cram as many delights as possible into the garden, sensible design is occasionally overlooked (or disregarded). I see no reason to excuse or apologize. I will gladly sacrifice proper design to add another treasure so long as the sacrifice is pushed off for a decade or longer. Troubles are seldom much of a bother.

The garden was never intended for show, though visitors still seem satisfied with the result. But, I advise, do not follow my lead if you are inclined to spending your weekends in leisure. There is much to keep up with.

Ferns and hostas flank this bluestone path

Ferns and hostas flank this bluestone path. The Ostrich ferns were transplanted from the forest at the border of the garden. The hostas encroach  too far across the path, just as I prefer but too far according to my wife.

My focus is often on the individual rather than the whole, though there are times I marvel that this haphazard plan has yielded a satisfactory outcome. If I avoid the panoramic view of the garden on these pages, it is that most often I revel in the form of the flower or foliage. And, just beyond view there is likely to be a pile of debris.

Today, I have cobbled together several wider views of the garden. Remarkably, there are few weeds. I hope that you will not see the messes in the background.

The view from the driveway to the back garden

The view from the driveway to the back garden. The yellow leaf Blue Mist shrub died back substantially over the winter, so it has not filled in as well as it should. Otherwise, I must selectively prune branches that flop over neighboring plants.

Looking across the koi pond to the stone patio and pavilion

Looking across the koi pond to the stone patio and pavilion. This view has changed in recent years as the Oakleaf hydrangea in the foreground has overwhelmed perennials. I must prune it annually to give several clumps of Japanese iris at the pond’s edge enough sunlight to flower. I’ve recently seen that there are dozens and possibly more than a hundred baby koi in the pond. Many will have to be relocated to one of the four other ponds.

My favorite spot in the garden. A stone path follows a stream with lined with moss covered stones, flanked by hostas, ferns, and Japanese Forest grass

My favorite spot in the garden. A stone path follows a stream lined with moss covered stones, flanked by hostas, ferns, and Japanese Forest grass.

This pond was the first of five constructed in the garden. It has been revised several times. A wide spreading 'Viridis' Japanese maple overhangs the pond.

This pond was the first of five constructed in the garden. It has been revised several times. A wide spreading ‘Viridis’ Japanese maple overhangs the pond.

The 'Viridis' Japanese maple encroaches further into this small patio each year. On the near side a dwarf spruce encroaches even further.

The ‘Viridis’ Japanese maple encroaches further into this small patio each year. On the near side a dwarf spruce encroaches even further. The ferns are Ostrich ferns transplanted from a damp area at the forest’s edge. The wood of the lichen covered chairs has not rotted, but I don’t trust the wooden dowels that hold it together, so I don’t set anything heavier than pruners on them.

The Oakleaf hydrangea must be pruned annually to leave space for the Pineapple lily. I've divided the lily a few times to plant around the garden.

The Oakleaf hydrangea must be pruned annually to leave space for the Pineapple lily. I’ve divided the lily a few times to plant around the garden.

'The dwarf 'Shaina' Japanese maple borders the patio beside the koi pond. In the foreground are Bletilla hardy orchids, and Oakleaf hydrangea beyond.

‘The dwarf ‘Shaina’ Japanese maple borders the patio beside the koi pond. In the foreground are Bletilla hardy orchids, ‘Globosa’ blue spruce, and ‘Silver Edge’ rhododendron. In back are ‘Silver Cloud’ redbud, and Oakleaf hydrangea. Smaller perennials are tucked between, but are not visible in this view.

A colorful jumble of foliage with dwarf spruce and Full Moon Japanese maple

A colorful jumble of foliage with ‘Ogon’ spirea, dwarf spruce, Red horse chestnut, and Golden Full Moon Japanese maple.

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8 thoughts on “When good sense is ignored

    • I have no doubt that I am frequently carried away, but I’m willing to manage the consequences. When I’m dead and gone I can hardly imagine when new owners are confronted with the labor to keep this garden up, not that I’m in a hurry to be gone.

      • I agree. 😃 I’m just getting started with the whole blog thing. If you get a chance check out my blog and tell me what you think and help spread the word. Thanks

    • Unfortunately, I’m limited in planting more by space, which I ran out of about a decade ago. This has slowed me down only a little.

  1. Amazing spaces – hope you can relax to enjoy them. Those darn plants. Why do they have to keep growing and taking more space than we want them too? If they would only stay one size.

  2. How warm are your winters to be able to have the koi pond with fish in it. I would love fish, but have no idea what to do with them in the winter. A pond would freeze solid here.

    • In most winters the ponds will be ice covered, at least for weeks and in recent winters, for months. The koi pond is deep enough that I’m not concerned if it remains frozen, though it does not freeze as solidly as in colder areas. The koi have not been bothered by the pond being ice covered, and this year there are more babies than I’ve ever seen. Too many. I guess fifty to one hundred fifty though my count is iffy since they refuse to be still.

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