A week away from the garden

A week ago, I left the garden in reasonably good order to travel to the west coast. Weeds were mostly under control, and I even fit in a bit of planting before leaving since a few afternoon storms were forecast. The storms faded, so the small perennials barely survived the week, but otherwise the garden was in fine shape when I returned. Still, there was some catching up to do before I can get back to my routine.Japanese maple

Many of the garden’s Japanese maples have been found on this annual journey to nurseries in Oregon, and again I’ve returned with plans to order a few. Now, I must figure out where they can be planted (Acer japonicum ‘Meigetsu’, above).

Until I’m back on track, here are a few photos taken upon my return.

Weeks after yellow, orange, and red deciduous azaleas have faded, this fragrant azalea has begun to flower.

Weeks after yellow, orange, and red deciduous azaleas have faded, this fragrant azalea has begun to flower. This azalea is part of a conglomeration, and with showier and brighter colored azaleas in the mass, I had forgotten about it. The fragrance helped me rediscover it.

Hosta medio variegata disappeared from garden centers years ago, replaced by better varieties, but it is well suited to this spot beside the bluestone walk that leads to the back deck.

Hosta medio variegata disappeared from garden centers years ago, replaced by better varieties, but it is well suited to this spot beside the bluestone walk that leads to the back deck. Surprisingly, the ivy planted long ago to cover bare spots does not cause much trouble besides requiring pruning a few times a year.

The bluestone path is flanked by hostas and ferns that must occasionally be pruned so the path does not disappear.

The bluestone path is flanked by hostas and ferns that must occasionally be pruned so the path does not disappear. The red leafed Japanese maple replaced a dwarf hemlock that died a few years ago, and the maple has struggled to rise above the tall Ostrich ferns. Some day branches of the Japanese maple will arch over the path.

Japanese irises and Oakleaf hydrangea spill over the edges of the koi pond.

Japanese irises and Oakleaf hydrangea spill over the edges of the koi pond.

 

 

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6 thoughts on “A week away from the garden

    • In our week in Oregon we visited 4-5 nurseries each day, mostly in the Gresham, Woodburn, and St. Paul areas. Many of these are growers that I have been dealing with for thirty years or more, including Spada Farms, Woodburn, Ernst, nurseries operated by the Ekstrom borthers, and many smaller growers. There are a few growers I have not visited in thirty five years traveling to Oregon, but not many. Since I have a particular interest in Japanese maples and conifers, this is my favorite region of the country for visiting nurseries.

    • Ostrich ferns, that were transplanted from a damp spot at the edge of the forest that borders the garden. While they are best suited to damp shade, this spot is moderately dry with much more sun than would seem to be ideal. But, like many shade loving plants, they will grow most vigorously in sun until a point where the sun is too intense, and then they will fail.

      • Thank you. I have lots of ostrich ferns but none are that big, perhaps because they do not receive that much sun. I may try t relocate some of them.

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