Deer in the autumn garden

With a one acre garden chock full of flowers, berries, and leafy treasures, I am pleased to do my small part to feed the neighborhood wildlife. Like it or not, and I don’t, the koi pond should be mentioned for attracting a variety of herons and snakes looking to feast on frogs and small fish. While the gardener can plant to attract bees and butterflies, some wildlife is enticed to visit despite his best efforts, and in recent weeks there have been more than the usual visits from our local deer population.

Why? In the hot and dry late summer many of the garden’s hostas took a premature turn for the worse. So, in August I quit spraying the deer repellent that very successfully encourages them to go elsewhere to snack. The result has been predictable.

Halcyon hosta eaten by deer while Frances Williams has barely been touched. The last deer repellent was sprayed in early August, and with drought damage in late summer it did not seem worthwhile to spray again. Deer will eat their favored hostas, and all will be fine in the spring.

Halcyon hosta eaten by deer while Frances Williams was barely touched until a few weeks later. The last deer repellent was sprayed in late July, and with drought damage in late summer it did not seem worthwhile to spray again.

With the last repellent application in late July, it was about six or seven weeks before the first signs of grazing. First were small leafed hostas, while larger leafed Frances Williams and others were ignored. But, over several weeks deer became bolder, and perhaps less discriminating, munching on hostas along the front walk before moving on to larger leafed varieties. With winter dormancy imminent, this was not a bother, and the progression from one variety to another has been interesting. Until.

To my thinking, the roughly corrugated leaves of Oakleaf hydrangea should not be appetizing to deer, especially as they turn in autumn. Wrong again.

To my thinking, the roughly corrugated leaves of Oakleaf hydrangea should not be appetizing to deer, especially as they turn in autumn. Wrong again.

While there was no concern for the hostas this late in the season, one thing led to another, and a few nibbles of hydrangeas turned to defoliation of lower branches Oakleaf hydrangeas and azaleas. This will not matter much, but along with leaves a few too many branch tips have been chewed off, and spring flower buds of azaleas have been lost. The next thing, I’m certain, will be the aucubas and camellias,which are only bothered in mid winter if I’ve missed one in spraying. So finally, I was spurred to action.

The usual double dose of repellent was sprayed, and I suspect this will be the last of the problem until spring, when the decision must be made when to spray to catch new growth as it opens.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Deer in the autumn garden

    • I’m currently spraying Bobbex, but I’ve sprayed Deer Away earlier in the year and usually alternate the two. I believe these repellents are more effective than predator urine, and I tried red pepper tablets unsuccessfully a few years ago that were supposed to be taken up through the roots to last most of the year.

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