Autumn fading

Flowering of camellias was exceptional through earlier parts of autumn, and though twenty degree nights brought ruin, many buds assure continued flowering for weeks. With nightly freezes common, even with mild afternoons in the forecast, white and pink blooms will frequently be bordered with brown. Still, there is no complaint.

With regular overnight temperatures in the twenties, this developing camellia flower is likely to be damaged.

While the foliage of many Japanese maples turns early in autumn, several delay into November, and these were damaged by freezes, turning immediately from green (or red) to brown. Certainly, there has been another year when this has occurred, but none that I recall. While repeated comments claim an early onset of cold, I suspect this is not at all unusual.

The Fernleaf Japanese maple was a few days from its peak autumn color when consecutive twenty degree nights turned leaves to brown.

The effect is that the typical process has been interrupted. Leaves that would fall after turning red and yellow are now brown, and clinging to trees. While unusual, there is no reason to suspect that any harm has been done.

The foliage of Oakleaf hydrangeas (above) typically turns late, and leathery leaves were not damaged by freezes. As always, with only evergreen foliage nearby, the large, burgundy colored leaves stand out. Also, I note that while foliage color of blueberries varies from year to year, leaves stand out as nearly as darkly colored as the hydrangeas.

Blush Pink nandina is colorful though the year, but colors become more intense with cold weather.

Colorful evergreens such as variegated English holly stand out when neighboring trees and shrubs are bare.