Surprise, surprise

Things are popping up all over the place. There are perennials and ephemerals (below) that I recognize and recall, and others that I have no idea what they could be. But, soon I’ll find out, and failing to recognize emerging old timers and newcomers is nothing new. I plant every year, and it’s easy to…

Unusual, but not rare

The vagaries of early spring weather occasionally bring together the flowering of all of the garden’s magnolias that more regularly bloom weeks apart, as well as other flowers holding over from late winter along with early spring bloomers. In this last week of March the winter flowering witch hazels (Hamamelis x intermedia) have faded with…

Almost as usual

Happily, I am still working, contentedly distracted by the everyday routine instead of the woes of today’s world. As I approach an indefinite but nearing schedule for retirement, I contemplate that first year when I can fully enjoy the garden in spring, not only the few evening and weekend hours. Today, many have been forced…

Boggy ground

I see no reason the gardener should desire an area of boggy ground, but here there is a rather large area that borders the garden that is constantly damp. I presume the source of the moisture is a spring that is in close proximity or perhaps beneath the garden shed. The spring dampens the forested…

Splendid days

Every day in the garden is splendid, though some more than others, and a few where dark clouds must be brushed aside for the barest glimpse of sunshine. I’ve been happily spoiled by mild temperatures in early March, so when a single night drops below freezing I am greatly disappointed. Much fussing ensues, but such…

A bee magnet

I am slightly curious why there are so few bees. When flowering in early March, a large ‘Dorothy Wycoff’ Japanese andromeda (Pieris japonica ‘Dorothy Wycoff’) by the corner of the garage attracts a multitude of bees that are often quite aggressive in early spring. I usually take an alternate route to the rear garden so…

No particular hurry

There’s no particular hurry, but I am somewhat mystified that two early flowering magnolias ‘Merrill’ and ‘Royal Star’ have not flowered yet in this very mild early March. On occasion, both have bloomed in late February when the flowers are prone to damage from frosts and freezes that are common into the early weeks of…

Sprung

Spring has started, at least the laboring part of it, though the weather also is cooperating most days with mild temperatures and no extreme cold in the forecast. An odd few days of cold are common through March, and even into April, but now we’re calling a daily high of fifty-three chilly, so that’s making…

Not so early

Unlike in many area gardens, no daffodils are flowering here, not even the early ‘February Gold’ that typically flowers the tenth day of March, but should be earlier in this very mild late winter. Several times in two decades it has flowered in February as its name suggests, but ‘February Gold’ is now shaded and…

A fabulous February

I hear no objections to the mild temperatures this winter, and in fact most everyone seems quite pleased by the absence of snow and extreme cold. Equally mild winters in recent years have enjoyed a similar reception. With less chill, there have been many more flowers in the garden through February, partly due to the…

Slow and unsteady

The start of the garden’s spring cleanup has been intentionally delayed, though the late winter weather has been perfectly suitable for outdoor labor. A considerable amount of fill in planting will be done early, and leaving the faded foliage is helpful so that new plantings aren’t dug into the same spot as something else. There’s…

Not bad, pretty good, can’t complain

Yes, I know. I should not celebrate this mild winter. The planet is doomed unless we change the error of our ways, but how can a gardener be blamed for enjoying the occasional winter when snow doesn’t cover the garden, and when the chill is mild enough that there are blooms everyday? And, not just…